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Bicentennial Events

 Teacher Training That Inspires Series
 April 5 & May 3 
 4:30 pm – 7:30 pm
*Food and Refreshments Included*
Teacher Training That Inspires is a series of sessions led by scholars/historians from the Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH). Through exploring the writings by and about Frederick Douglass and the places associated with his life and work, these ASALH training sessions provide a valuable tool for teaching, for learning, and for discovering our community in new ways. The sessions are free to attend, but RSVP is required. ASALH is working in cooperation with the Maryland Commission on African American History and Culture and the National Park Service.
Generation Douglass Panel Discussion
Tuesday, April 24, 6:30 pm 
Location: Francis Scott Key Auditorium, St. Johns College 
A panel of distinguished scholars will present their research and experiences exploring the history and legacy of Frederick Douglass. 
After their individual presentations, a moderated panel discussion will take place with a Q&A. 
The Politics of Activism
Thursday, May 5, 6:30 pm – 8:30 pm
Inspired by the profound and complicated relationship between Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln, The Politics of Activism discussion explores historic and contemporary roles and intersections between activism and politics. Audiences will hear diverse ideas and perspectives on the topic and engage with leading scholars, activists, and elected officials of today. This event is in partnership with the Banneker-Douglass Museum and President Lincoln’s Cottage. President Lincoln’s Cottage is a national monument on the grounds of the Soldiers’ Home, known today as the Armed Forces Retirement Home.
Lecture by Kenneth Morris 
Tuesday, May 22, 6:30 pm 
Location: Francis Scott Key Auditorium, St. Johns College 
Kenneth Morris descends from two very important names in American history: he is the great-great-great grandson of Frederick Douglass and great-great grandson of Booker T. Washington.  Mr. Morris will share with the audience how the Douglass legacy has inspired his life and contributed to his work as a social activist.  Attendees will also learn about The Frederick Douglass Family Initiative (FDFI), Morris’ abolitionist organization that combines lessons from the legacies of Frederick Douglass and Booker T. Washington through education.  As culmination to his lecture, Mr. Morris will participate in a youth moderated discussion that explores his  experiences as a Douglass family member.  
Frederick Douglass Community Day
Sunday, July 1, 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Inspired by the famous Frederick Douglass speech “What to the Slave is the Fourth of July?” BDM will host a fun summer event that features performances, a Frederick Douglass re-enactment, food/beverage, guided tours of our exhibitions, and family fun and educational arts & crafts activities. Families and community members of all ages and backgrounds will explore topics of freedom, community, art, and history. Learn more about the famous speech!